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20130101
20130131
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MSNBCW 7
MSNBC 6
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English 15
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
powerful leaders like egypt's hosni mubarak and libya's moammar gadhafi, and unleashing a flood of illegal weapons. >> when gadhafi was falling, i was there at the time, i had never seen so many weapons in my entire life. and they were just being taken from depots, they were being handed over to militant groups. and then they went all over the region. they went from country to country, and they fell into the hands of militant groups. and this is no longer theoretical. seven americans have been killed, including a u.s. master, just in the last four months. >> call it the downside of the arab spring. revolutions that the u.s. are actively, tacitly supported in places like libya and egypt have left shaking governments in place and more instability to an already volatile region. delaware democratic senator chris coons shares the senate foreign relations subcommittee on africa and he joins me now. senator coons, thank you so much for being on the program. >> thank you, luke. >> i want to ask you, we were very much supportive here in the united states two years ago, on the two-year anniversary o
on the egyptians during the three tect rule. former strong man hosni mubarak. >> to end the bloodshed, to have security against vandals. and for the perception of citizens, i have decided after referring to the constitution to announce imposing of the state of emergency. >> stagnant economy in a divided political environment, egyptians are frustrated with the slow pace of reforms. increasing theyly complain morsi and the ruling muslim brotherhood party halftimeed thhijackedrevolution and are img islamic dictatorship. >> morsi called on the opposition to engage in national dialogue. the offer was quickly rejected leave nothing clear route to ending the turmoil. bret? >> bret: connor, thank you. police in brazil made three arrests and reportedly detained a fourth person in connection with sunday morning nightclub fire. police say a banned pyrotechnic show started the fire. it's believe two members of the band and two of the club's owners are in custody. the white house is condemning what it calls iran violation of the universal freedom of religion. american pastor saeed abadini was reportedly co
at those ongoing celebrations marking two years since the uprising that toppled former president hosni mubarak. we're going to keep our eye on what's going on in tahrir square and bring you details right here. >>> back here at home from last-minute voter i.d. bills to laws limiting voting, republicans pulled out all the stops to try and win the presidency and the wheels haven't stopped turning. reince priebus is backing a plan by republicans in virginia and other battleground states that president obama won in 2012 that would change how those states electoral college votes are allocated. one electoral vote would be awarded to the winner of each congressional district. had that plan been in effect in 2012, instead of president obama gaining 332 to romney's 226, romney would have won with 226 electoral votes despite losing the popular vote. joining me now, ed schultz, host of the "ed show." let's take a look at how virginia would have gone if governor romney had take ten. president obama earned all 13 electoral votes. under this plan, romney would have earned 9 to the president's 4. virg
. >> the second anniversary of the revolution that ousted hosni mubarak. they say morrissey has betrayed the revolution, and dozens were injured. some hospitalized. nbc's amman joins me from cairo. let's talk about the protests, pro and conmorsi today. what is the overall feeling about president morsi two years in? >> if we had to measure it by the show of force or the protesters that are out today, you would say that on the second anniversary, his popularity among those on the streets, is very low. in fact, you know, andrea, we're standing several hundred feet among one of the streets near the division building here, and the tear gas that is being used is so strong we can feel it here in our office. these clashes have been by protesters who say that president morsi and the muslim brotherhood are taking over egypt and betraying the aspirations of a revolution they foot for two years ago. now, no doubt, president morsi and the muslim brotherhood enjoy support and popularity. they are not on the streets today. that is because the muslim brotherhood has ordered their supporters and their fo
in the book, a fundamental central player to the egyptian revolution that overthrew hosni mubarak, and their response to the port say yesterday soccer riot is a very interesting part of what's taking place right there. the focus on the police as opposed to going after other souk soccer clubs and the third thing, and i don't think once again this has been talked about nearly enough, has been the historic -- no matter what one things about president obama, the historic nature of electing the first african-american president in 2008 had an effect of raising the confidence of athletes, particularly african-american athletes. >> that brings me to my second question. >> yeah. >> there's been tremendous pressure on athletes to essentially shut up and play unless they are endorsing something. >> exactly. >> and an increasing number of athletes don't seem to be separating their politics from the profession. this is a recent example, a power forward for the nba's denver nuggets. take a look and i want to talk about this on the other side. >> my mom to my right is mahassan and my mom to the
. the unrest started last week on the second anniversary of the uprising that overthrew former president, hosni mubarak. >>> a soldier who lost all four limbs in a roadside bombing in iraq now has two new arms following a double transplant. 26-year-old brendan morocco will show off his arms at a news conference in the next hour. those transplants are only the seventh double hand or double arm transplants ever done in the united states. >>> severe flooding has killed four people and forced thousands of others from their homes in the northeast of australia. all from a tropical cyclone, churning just off the coast. another affect of the storm, the sea is whipping up massive amounts of foam, covering beaches and even streets. in some areas, look at these pictures, the foam is 10 feet deep. >>> more trouble for jailed former football great, jonlg simpson. tmz reports simpson owes more than $500,000 in back taxes. according to the report, the irs has just slapped him with another tax lien. that is the third time in the last 12 months. >>> bailout rage returns. cnbc's mandy drury is here with what's m
has ordered a retrial for former president hosni mubarak. i'm joined by msnbc contributor, joy reed, and tara mcinnis, executive director for american for progress action fun and professor of linguistics and contributing editor at the new republic and columnist at the "new york daily news" and amy goodman, author and, of course, host of "democracy now." >>> this week president obama anoupsed three cabinet nominations all white men. the five departures which as of wednesday include hilda solace to our males. the appointments have called into question the president's commitment to diversity in his second term, concerns by a mick kmur in "the new york times" on tuesday, showing president obama last month in the oval office surrounded by his closest advisers discussing fiscal cliff negotiations. 1 of 11 is a woman, valerie jarrett who's leg is barely visible. that picture is not fully illustrative of the president's record. according to the "new york times" 43% of mr. obama's appointees have been women. that's roughly the same as clinton and one-third more than george w. bush and he's n
could have miscalculated as badly as they did. >> he miscalculated in exactly the way that hosni mubarak did. he overreached. he came in with a reasonable mandate. and if he had tried to reach out and work with other elements within the state then things might have worked out very differently. because he's overreached, he is now quasi peril lous in some places and the economy is tanking. >> you know, the story of the egyptian people and the egyptian middle class is a fascinating story. they have obviously, the rest of the arab world follows what egypt does. one-third of arabs in the world are in egypt. they've always been the leader of that civilization. but this is -- these are people that haven't been swept up in islamic radicalism through the years. i remember the brutal attacks of tourists in luxor back in the late 1990s. it so offended the egyptian middle class that it was seen as a terrible setback within the ranks of al qaeda in the long-term. >> that's right. a lot of people voted for the muslim brotherhood and voted for other islamic parties not because they particularly wanted
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)